Holy Bible: King James Version (KJV): Authorized Version 1611

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King James’s Bible is used as the name for the 1611 translation (on a par with the “Genevan Bible” or the “Rhemish Testament”) in Charles Butler’s Horae Biblical (first published 1797). Other works from the early 19th century confirm the widespread use of this name on both sides of the Atlantic: it is found both in a “Historical sketch of the English translations of the Bible” published in Massachusetts in 1815 and in an English publication from 1818, which explicitly states that the 1611 version is “generally known by the name of King James’s Bible”. This name was also found as King James’ Bible (without the final “s”): for example in a book review from 1811. The phrase “King James’s Bible” is used as far back as 1715, although in this case, it is not clear whether this is a name or merely a description.

The use of Authorized Version, capitalized and used as a name, is found as early as 1814. For some time before this, descriptive phrases such as “our present, and only publicly authorized version” (1783), “our Authorized version” (1792), and “the authorized version” (1801, uncapitalized) are found. The Oxford English Dictionary records a usage in 1824. In Britain, the 1611 translation is generally known as the “Authorized Version” today.

King James’ Version, evidently a descriptive phrase, is found being used as early as 1814. “The King James Version” is found, unequivocally used as a name, in a letter from 1855. The next year King James Bible, with no possessive, appears as a name in a Scottish source. In the United States, the “1611 translation” (actually editions following the standard text of 1769, see below) is generally known as the King James Version today.

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King James’s Bible is used as the name for the 1611 translation (on a par with the “Genevan Bible” or the “Rhemish Testament”) in Charles Butler’s Horae Biblical (first published 1797). Other works from the early 19th century confirm the widespread use of this name on both sides of the Atlantic: it is found both in a “Historical sketch of the English translations of the Bible” published in Massachusetts in 1815 and in an English publication from 1818, which explicitly states that the 1611 version is “generally known by the name of King James’s Bible”. This name was also found as King James’ Bible (without the final “s”): for example in a book review from 1811. The phrase “King James’s Bible” is used as far back as 1715, although in this case, it is not clear whether this is a name or merely a description.

The use of Authorized Version, capitalized and used as a name, is found as early as 1814. For some time before this, descriptive phrases such as “our present, and only publicly authorized version” (1783), “our Authorized version” (1792), and “the authorized version” (1801, uncapitalized) are found. The Oxford English Dictionary records a usage in 1824. In Britain, the 1611 translation is generally known as the “Authorized Version” today.

King James’ Version, evidently a descriptive phrase, is found being used as early as 1814. “The King James Version” is found, unequivocally used as a name, in a letter from 1855. The next year King James Bible, with no possessive, appears as a name in a Scottish source. In the United States, the “1611 translation” (actually editions following the standard text of 1769, see below) is generally known as the King James Version today.

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Weight 2 kg

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